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Classic Film: Mrs. Minerva

Mrs. Miniver (1942)

a romanticc war drama inspired by the 1940 novel by Jan Struther. Directed by William Wyler, the film starrs Greer Garson, Walter Pidgeon, Teresa Wright, May Whitty, and Reginald Owen. The movie won six Academy Awards - Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actress, Best Supporting Actress, Best Screenplay and Best Black and White Cinematography. Walter Pidgeon was nominated but did not win for Best Actor.

the Screenplay for Mrs. Miniver was being written in 1940 before the U.S. got into the war. As the war tension increased, the scripts kept getting more and more pro-England and anti-German. for example, the scene in which Greer Garson confronts the German pilot, kept on getting more and more confrontational. By the time the script was finished, Garson is slapping the pilot.

Franklin Roosevelt considered the film an important inspirational piece and had it rushed in the theatres. The government used parts of the final sermon in leaflets at the time.
Mrs. Miniver (1942) a romanticc war drama inspired by the 1940 novel by Jan Struther. Directed by William Wyler, the film starrs Greer Garson, Walter Pidgeon, Teresa Wright, May Whitty, and Reginald Owen. The movie won six Academy Awards - Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actress, Best Supporting Actress, Best Screenplay and Best Black and White Cinematography. Walter Pidgeon was nominated but did not win for Best Actor.

the Screenplay for Mrs. Miniver was being written in 1940 before the U.S. got into the war. As the war tension increased, the scripts kept getting more and more pro-England and anti-German. for example, the scene in which Greer Garson confronts the German pilot, kept on getting more and more confrontational. By the time the script was finished, Garson is slapping the pilot.

Franklin Roosevelt considered the film an important inspirational piece and had it rushed in the theatres. The government used parts of the final sermon in leaflets at the time.

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