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My Blog

Rebeca; Chapter 9

The library on St. Simons Island does a novel/movie series every quarter.  This quarter we are doing our series "Hitchcock: Before and After Hollywood" online.  This month we are discussing the novel and movie "Rebecca."  This is a summary of Chapter 9

Chapter 9 
·      When Maxim’s sister, Beatrice, and her husband arrive, the narrator wants to “hide, to get out of the window into the garden…” despising herself as she seeks an escape.

Novel/Movie Series: He Who Gets Slapped (1924)

We are doing our Novel'Movie Series online this quarter.  The subject of this series is "Hitchcock: Before and AFter Hollywood."  I thought it might be fun, however, today to talk about a film that was recently shown on TCM "He Who Gets Slapped." 

You can join our discussion by emailing me at cjjohns@tds.net, or on Facebook at St. Simons Library Novel and Movie Series or at www.christinajjohns.com.  We are doing Rebecca this month.


HE Who Gets Slapped (1924)

Rebecca; Chapter 7

We are doing our novel/movie series online this quarter.  The series is "Hitchcock: Before and AFter Hollywood."  This month we will be discussing "Rebecca," by Daphne du Maurier.

You can follow us here, or at www.christinajjohns.com or on Facebook at St. Simons Library Novel and Movie Series.  Or, you can email me at cjjohns@tds.net and ask to be put on the mailing list.

Hitchcock: Rebecca Chapter 7

We're doing our Novel/Movie Series online this quarter.  The series is Hitchcock: Before and After Hollywood.  This month we are discussing the film Rebecca, based on Daphne du Maurier's novel.


Rebecca: Chapters 5-6

We are doing our Novel/Movie series online.  The current series "Hitchcock: Before and After Hollywood" will cover "The 39 Steps" "Rebecca" "Dial M for Murder" and "Sabatoge."

This is a sumary of chapters 5-6 of the novel, Rebecca:


5
•        Maxim explains that “all memories are bitter, and I prefer to ignore them.  Something happened a year ago that altered my whole life, and I want to forget every phase of my existence up to that time….

Hitchcock Series: Rebecca

Rebecca
 
Chapter 4
 
·      The narrator in Daphne du Maurier’s novel “Rebecca is never named.  Du Maurier wrote later that this was because she could never come up with the right name for the character and as she continued to write, it became easier just not to name her.
·      Maxim refers to the narrator’s name as “very lovely and unusual” but the name is never mentioned.
·      The narrator, however, struggles throughout the novel to establish a “name” for herself.

Hitchcock: Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier

Rebecca
 
Chapter 4
 
·      The narrator in Daphne du Maurier’s novel “Rebecca is never named.  Du Maurier wrote later that this was because she could never come up with the right name for the character and as she continued to write, it became easier just not to name her.
·      Maxim refers to the narrator’s name as “very lovely and unusual” but the name is never mentioned.
·      The narrator, however, struggles throughout the novel to establish a “name” for herself.

Rbecca: Chapter 3

Rebecca: Chapter 3
 
“I wonder what my life would be today, if Mrs. Van Hopper had not been a snob.”
 
That is the opening line of Chapter 3 of Daphne Du Maurier’s Rebecca. 
 
A lot of Rebecca is about class, about the central character’s feelings of inferiority because she is not considered of the class of her husband, Maxim, and his family and friends.  There is, however, very little snobbery from the upper class she so fears.  The real class snobbery comes from Mrs. Van Hopper, her employer, from the servants in the posh hotel where Mrs.

Rebecca: Chapter 2

Mrs. Danvers


In the first chapter of Rebecca, Du Murier describes the dream of her main character.  The dream is returning to Manderley and in this first chapter she lays down the foundation of themes that are to come.  Fear is the primary one, fear and foreboding.
 
In the dream, nature has overwhelmed the stately and manicured mansion and threatens it.  The reader is left with a sense of unease, a sense of turmoil overrunning order.  Manderley is identified as at the center of the dream and of the story and the reader is told very clearly that the couple can never go back to Manderley.

Feminism, Winnie Verloc and Conrad's The Secret Agent

Conrad once described “The Secret Agent” as the story of Winnie Verloc.  The novel, though, is seldom thought of as the story of a woman.  Conrad, in fact, is often dismissed as a sexist.  His women characters are usually thought of as one-dimensional and passive.

None of the adaptations of “The Secret Agent” (and I have now watched four of them) really make this the story of Winnie Verloc.  So, even after four adaptations (covering a span of 70 years), we still are waiting for one to fully express this as a woman’s story.
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